EIJ Day 3: The Decline of International News Reporting in the U.S.

By Abby Yimer

During the last day of EIJ, “The Decline of International News Reporting in the U.S.” began with Michael Gargiulo, an anchor at NBC 4 New York, speaking about his experience working as a reporter in Iraq and Kuwait. He spoke on the importance of making sure that we are focused on other parts of the globe, not just the United States.

“Cover the world. Cover it completely,” he said.

The session continued with a panel of four other journalists who spoke about their experiences working across the globe.

Erik Kirschbaum, the executive director of RIAS Berlin Commission, discussed his time working as a correspondent for the Reuters international news agency.

The panel moved on to focus on the main topic: Why is that Americans are so uninterested in foreign news?

Ralph Begleiter, who traveled while working for CNN, mentioned how this problem wasn’t something new. He has seen this trend his entire career. Begleiter described his work on CNN’s “International Hour.” He remembers their broadcast being cut short because of the OJ Simpson trial and the same cycle continuing when other U.S. news came through. International news is always on the back burner.

Teri Schultz, who covers the European Union, echoed the same idea but added that in America today, citizens are no longer just ignoring international news but being told to despise other countries and what they think.

The final panelist, Stacey Samuel, who is a supervising editor at NPR, touched on the importance of radio when approaching international coverage.

The session concluded with the panelists discussing the importance of educating our nation’s future on the rest of the world and its history.

“There’s a world, there’s history, we’re only one part. Americans don’t care because we’re not doing the job of educating.”

We’re one of the top SPJ campus chapters in the nation!

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We’ve got news! At the Excellence in Journalism conference in Baltimore, DePaul’s SPJ chapter was named runner-up for national campus chapter of the year.

Congratulations to this year’s board and the 2017-18 officers for all their hard work in earning this honor.

DePaul SPJ chapter also was recognized as the Region 5 Campus Chapter of the Year and Region 5 Program of the Year for Public Newsroom.

Here are some ways that SPJ DePaul can help with your journalism career this year:

  • The Public Newsroom series with 14 East magazine brings together journalists, experts and members of the public to learn about and discuss how to cover subjects that are important to the community, such as voting, mental health and cybersecurity
  • Newsroom tours take DePaul student journalists behind the scenes and provide a chance to meet Chicago professionals
  • Panels and workshops build skills and show how pro journalists produce great stories
  • Social events give an opportunity to meet other DePaul journalism students and talk about shared interests

Want to join SPJ? Visit this page to learn more.

Interested in applying for a free membership? Stay tuned for details.

Questions? Email chapter adviser Amy Merrick, amerric1@depaul.edu, or President Carina Smith, carinasmithnews@gmail.com

Thanks to all our SPJ members for contributing to our chapter!

 

EIJ Day 3: Investigative Journalism and Podcasts

We’re sharing highlights from the Excellence in Journalism national conference. Follow @spjonadepaul on Twitter for more journalism news and tips!

By Lacey Latch

On the final day of EIJ 2018, investigative journalists convened to discussed the fairly recent transition of in-depth reporting in “Through Earbuds: Investigative Journalism and Podcasts.” Led by Nicole Vap, the director of Investigative Journalism at 9NEWS in Denver, the panel included Sarah Delia, reporter and host of the podcast “She Says,” which follows a sexual assault case in North Carolina, and Amber Hunt, host of “Accused” which investigates an unsolved murder.

Below, I have compiled a list of recommended investigative journalism podcasts to inspire the next generation of podcasting reporters:

WBEZ and the Chicago Tribune dive deep into the trial of Chicago police officer Jason van Dyke in the killing of Laquan McDonald in 2014. With background and context explained, reporters follow each day of the high-profile trial and experts give their take on the historic event.

Season one follows the abduction case of Jacob Wetterling, which remained unsolved for nearly three decades due largely to a mishandled police investigation. APM Reports further explains how the notorious child abduction case fueled national anxiety and led to the creation of the nation-wide sex-offender registry.

The Center for Investigative Reporting consists of a team of talented multimedia reporters that consistently create impressive podcasts that tell important stories and hold the powerful accountable.

The award-winning podcast, created by the people behind “This American Life,” is hosted by Sarah Koenig, wherein she tells one true story each season. Season one looks into a murder trial in Baltimore in which an innocent man might have been convicted.