We’re one of the top SPJ campus chapters in the nation!

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We’ve got news! At the Excellence in Journalism conference in Baltimore, DePaul’s SPJ chapter was named runner-up for national campus chapter of the year.

Congratulations to this year’s board and the 2017-18 officers for all their hard work in earning this honor.

DePaul SPJ chapter also was recognized as the Region 5 Campus Chapter of the Year and Region 5 Program of the Year for Public Newsroom.

Here are some ways that SPJ DePaul can help with your journalism career this year:

  • The Public Newsroom series with 14 East magazine brings together journalists, experts and members of the public to learn about and discuss how to cover subjects that are important to the community, such as voting, mental health and cybersecurity
  • Newsroom tours take DePaul student journalists behind the scenes and provide a chance to meet Chicago professionals
  • Panels and workshops build skills and show how pro journalists produce great stories
  • Social events give an opportunity to meet other DePaul journalism students and talk about shared interests

Want to join SPJ? Visit this page to learn more.

Interested in applying for a free membership? Stay tuned for details.

Questions? Email chapter adviser Amy Merrick, amerric1@depaul.edu, or President Carina Smith, carinasmithnews@gmail.com

Thanks to all our SPJ members for contributing to our chapter!

 

EIJ Day 3: Investigative Journalism and Podcasts

We’re sharing highlights from the Excellence in Journalism national conference. Follow @spjonadepaul on Twitter for more journalism news and tips!

By Lacey Latch

On the final day of EIJ 2018, investigative journalists convened to discussed the fairly recent transition of in-depth reporting in “Through Earbuds: Investigative Journalism and Podcasts.” Led by Nicole Vap, the director of Investigative Journalism at 9NEWS in Denver, the panel included Sarah Delia, reporter and host of the podcast “She Says,” which follows a sexual assault case in North Carolina, and Amber Hunt, host of “Accused” which investigates an unsolved murder.

Below, I have compiled a list of recommended investigative journalism podcasts to inspire the next generation of podcasting reporters:

WBEZ and the Chicago Tribune dive deep into the trial of Chicago police officer Jason van Dyke in the killing of Laquan McDonald in 2014. With background and context explained, reporters follow each day of the high-profile trial and experts give their take on the historic event.

Season one follows the abduction case of Jacob Wetterling, which remained unsolved for nearly three decades due largely to a mishandled police investigation. APM Reports further explains how the notorious child abduction case fueled national anxiety and led to the creation of the nation-wide sex-offender registry.

The Center for Investigative Reporting consists of a team of talented multimedia reporters that consistently create impressive podcasts that tell important stories and hold the powerful accountable.

The award-winning podcast, created by the people behind “This American Life,” is hosted by Sarah Koenig, wherein she tells one true story each season. Season one looks into a murder trial in Baltimore in which an innocent man might have been convicted.

EIJ Day 2: Bad News Writing

We’re sharing highlights from the Excellence in Journalism national conference. Follow @spjonadepaul on Twitter for more journalism news and tips!

By Erica Carbajal

On day two in Baltimore for EIJ 2018, the “Bad News Writing: The no good, the bad and the ugly” session led by radio journalist Christopher Cruise served as a good reminder for fellow journalists in the room: write like you talk.

The breakout session started off by highlighting the “strange” ways we as reporters often talk and write, and how it’s almost like its own language. The audience poked fun at this while watching the “How a local news anchor makes a phone call” video by feature reporter, Kate Welshofer. The crowd laughed and nodded along in agreement at the exaggerated pronunciation and change in tone, recognizing Welshofer’s demonstration of news reporter speaking style in themselves.

Cruise’s presentation then transitioned into the overused phrases and journalism cliches that can be seen in almost any local newscast. “What does an ‘area resident’ mean?” Cruise asked, “Why don’t we just say ‘local resident’?” and the audience laughed in agreement. His favorite though, is “local hospital.” Cruise said he sees this in almost every script that comes across his desk. His simple solution is to write like you talk. “Just say ‘hospital,'” Cruise said, reminding everyone that no viewer or reader will assume a victim was taken to a hospital hours away.

My personal favorite phrase that I hear often, particularly on broadcast news, was “brutal gang rape.” Cruise said “Is there any other kind of gang rape?” reminding members of the field to avoid fillers and tell a story similar to the way you really talk, while maintaining balance and professionalism, of course.

Cruise convinced us to always consult the “Overused Phrase List” when in doubt, and to never reference tragedies as “terrible” again.

Excellence in Journalism 2018: Scholarships Available!

Want to attend #EIJ18, SPJ’s national conference Sept. 27-29 in Baltimore? SPJ wants to help cover your costs! Check out the opportunities and application deadlines.
STUDENTS
EIJ News Internships: Ten student interns will gain experience and make connections while covering the EIJ18 conference, by using multimedia approaches in a student newsroom. If selected, you’ll get one conference registration, complimentary four-night stay at the conference hotel, some meals and the chance to show off your talents and network with other journalists. Applications for the EIJ News Team are due April 30Apply now.
Columbia Journalism School Student Fellowships: The Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism is providing funds for five SPJ student members from any school to attend EIJ18. If selected, you’ll get one conference registration and $575 to use toward travel expenses. Applications are due May 18Apply now.
Robert D.G. Lewis First Amendment Award: The Lewis family’s generosity provides this scholarship to one SPJ student member who has demonstrated outstanding service to the First Amendment through the field of journalism. If selected, you’ll get one conference registration and $350 to use toward travel expenses. Applications are due June 5Apply now.
PROFESSIONALS
Dori Maynard Diversity Leadership Program: The goal of the program is to increase the diversity of SPJ members within the organization. Each year, SPJ selects six members to participate as SPJ Diversity Leadership Fellows. The fellowship provides funds for fellows to receive a conference registration, airfare (up to $300), four-night hotel accommodations at EIJ18 and one ticket to the SPJ President’s Installation Banquet on Sept. 29 Get the details and apply now.
Terry Harper Memorial Scholarships: The Terry Harper Memorial Scholarship is open to professional, post-grad and retired members. It is given in honor of Terry Harper, SPJ’s executive director from 2002-2009. The scholarship provides funds for up to five members to receive a conference registration, airfare, four-night hotel accommodations at EIJ18 and one ticket to the SPJ President’s Installation Banquet on Sept. 29. Applications are due June 5Get the details and apply now. For eligibility and application information, click here.